A platform for clinicians to share and increase knowledge about topical, innovative issues in Vascular Access and Infusion Therapies with the aim of ensuring safe patient-centered IV practices.

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On Vascular Access and IV Infusion Therapies

The routes of vascular access device infections

The routes of vascular access device infections

The need for vascular access to administer intravenous medicines and fluids is an essential part of healthcare delivery in acutely ill patients. It is suggested that most patients admitted to acute hospitals will have at least one vascular access device (VAD) inserted during their hospital stay.

PICC placement in patients with Atrial Fibrillation

PICC placement in patients with Atrial Fibrillation

Since the late 1980s, Dr Pittiruti and Dr LaGreca of the Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli in Rome have been researching the possibility of using ECG to locate the tip of a PICC. In 1989, they studied the feasibility of analysing the TQ segment to use this system in patients with atrial fibrillation.

The varying terminology surrounding Midline Catheters

The varying terminology surrounding Midline Catheters

Vascular Access Devices (VADs) are divided into two basic groupings, peripheral and central. The group delineation is determined, primarily, by the catheter tip termination position, rather that the insertion site. Peripheral catheter tips remain in the periphery, terminate distal to the subclavian or femoral vein, and are optimal for intravenous medications that are peripherally compatible.

Midline Catheter at home

Midline Catheter at home

This pandemic has confirmed a reality for us: hospitals are for acute patients. Although this is not new, we are now able to put it into action: now more than ever our home is our shelter. Home health care, specifically in the field of vascular access, IS feasible.

When should I remove a PICC if it is infected?

When should I remove a PICC if it is infected?

An increasing number of hospitalised patients require the use of venous access devices (VADs). Intravenous therapy has therefore been a topic of high clinical relevance in recent decades. There are currently several types of catheters, and the choice between them depends on a number of factors.

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